Orissa Feeney | How Did The Good Friday Agreement Come About
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How Did The Good Friday Agreement Come About

How Did The Good Friday Agreement Come About

As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had founded Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and asserted territorial right to the whole of Ireland) and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. The agreement consists of two related documents, both agreed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998 in Belfast: although Prime Minister Johnson and Irish leaders have promised to protect the Good Friday agreement, some Brexit supporters have taken the opportunity to criticise power-sharing institutions, arguing that the pact was obsolete. Some members of the DUP, who opposed the agreement in 1998, also questioned the provisions it adopted. The agreement was for Northern Ireland to be part of the United Kingdom and remain in place until a majority of the population of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland wished otherwise. If this happens, the British and Irish governments will be “obliged” to implement this decision. On Friday, April 10, 1998, at 5:30 p.m., an American politician named George Mitchell, who led the talks, said: “I am pleased to announce that the two governments and political parties in Northern Ireland have reached an agreement.” With regard to the constitutional question of whether Northern Ireland should remain in the United Kingdom or whether it should be part of a unified Ireland, it was agreed that there would be no change without the agreement of the majority. This is called the “consent principle.” Majority opinion could be tested by referendum in the future. These institutional provisions, established in these three areas of action, are defined in the agreement as “interdependent and interdependent”. In particular, it is found that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of individual countries depends on that of the other” and that participation in the North-South Council of Ministers “is one of the essential tasks assigned to the relevant bodies in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland].

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